He Has Sold 100 Million Books


Paulo Coelho

The most widely published Brazilian author of all time, Paulo Coelho has sold close to 100 million copies of his books and has also been a theater director, an actor, a songwriter, and a journalist. 

When Paulo Coelho told his parents he wanted to be a writer, they thought he was crazy—literally. The Brazilian teenager’s parents had him committed to an insane asylum!

Paulo escaped three times before he was finally released and ready to follow a more normal path through life. He then enrolled in law school, as his parents desired.

But his creative instinct was too strong to be locked away, either behind bars or inside his own life. He had to break free. So Paulo dropped out of school, became a hippie, and traveled around Brazil looking for his inspiration. He found it through music and started writing amazing, strange, and wonderful songs. Soon, Paulo Coelho’s work was being recorded by some of the biggest singing stars in Brazil.

Unfortunately, the oppressive military government at that time thought his songs were too subversive because they talked about freedom and defying authority. Coelho was arrested and tortured for his beliefs.

However, nothing would stop him from using his creative powers. Years after his release, Coelho went for a walk— a 500-mile walk along a road in northern Spain. He used the time to reflect on his life, and he came to the realization that he still wanted to be a writer.

So even though he was now middle-aged, Paulo Coelho started on a new career as a novelist. His first two books went nowhere, but his third book, The Alchemist, made world history. It has sold more than sixty million copies (one of the bestselling books ever written), and holds the world record for being translated into more languages—seventy-one—than any other book by a living author.

Since then, Coelho has written more than two dozen books, sharing his unique world view with readers everywhere. He has also been a pioneer of sharing his work for free—his publisher once caught him pirating his own books online. His greatest life lesson, he says, has been to never surrender your dreams or give up on making them come true. “The secret to life,” according to Coelho, “is to fall down seven times, but to get back up eight times.”

Paulo Coelho is also an outspoken activist for peace and social justice. He is a Messenger of Peace for the UN, an Ambassador to the European Union for Intercultural Dialogue, and a member of many other organizations that advocate for peace.

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This is an excerpt from the book Inspiration to Live Your MAGIC!™, 75 Inspiring Biographies by Larry Anderson. It is available as a print book from Amazon.com and as a Kindle e-book.

The Power of Hope

This is a excerpt from my forthcoming book, Inspiration to Live Your MAGIC!™ to be published in January 2012. A collection of 75 biographical introductions that inspire.

Anne Frank

Author of a diary that chronicled the fate of a Jewish family in Nazi Germany, teenager Anne Frank died in a concentration camp; but, decades later, her diary was published in more than sixty languages.

Being a Jew in Nazi Germany was a horrific fate. Adolf Hitler and the Nazis took away the Jews’ jobs, property, and rights, then began sending them to concentration camps where they worked under horrible conditions and were beaten, starved, and often killed en masse in gas ovens.

Anne Frank was just four years old when the Nazis came to power, and her family wisely fled from Germany to Holland. But the Germans soon invaded Holland and began rounding up all Jews to be sent to the death camps.

Her father took thirteen-year-old Anne and her mother and sister into hiding. He had a secret apartment built in his office building, and some of his employees bravely brought them food and supplies. Anne and her family hid in the cramped quarters for two years, living in constant fear of being discovered.

Anne, who had been a very good student, began to keep a journal to help pass the long days. She wrote about her family members’ daily lives, about the terrible fate of their friends and others at the hands of the Nazis, and about her dreams of freedom. She still had the courage to hope.

Their secret hiding place was so well constructed that they might have stayed hidden for the entire war, but someone betrayed them and told the Nazis.

Anne’s father was sent to one death camp; the two girls and their mother were sent to another. Anne’s mother gave all her food to her two daughters to help keep them alive. , and starved to death; the two girls, working like slaves, sick, and existing on tiny amounts of rotten food, also died a few months later.

The only survivor was Anne’s father. After the war, he went back to Holland and found the loyal workers who had hidden his family. They had saved Anne’s diary, hoping to return it to her.

When Anne’s father saw how well written his daughter’s journal was, and the powerful tale it told of suffering under the Nazis, he determined to have it published. The Diary of Anne Frank is considered one of the most important books of the twentieth century.

Today, Anne’s diary is often studied in schools to demonstrate the terrible human cost of bigotry and hatred—as well as the power of hope.

Want to know more? Anne Frank

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© Copyright 2011, LIAP Media Corp.

LIAP Media Corp. the publisher of the Live Your MAGIC!™ series of books is a social enterprise. Part of the Larry & Janet Anderson Philanthropies.

All author Royalties and publishing profits are donated to our charity, education and arts partners.


Free The Children Founder

This is a excerpt from my forthcoming book Inspiration to Live Your MAGIC!™ to be published in January 2012. A collection of 75 biographical introductions that inspire.

 

Craig Keilburger

Creator of Free The Children, an organization whose purpose is to free child slaves all over the world and provide them with an education, Craig Kielburger was a child himself when his passion to help children began.

One morning in 1995, twelve-year-old Craig Kielburger was flipping through a newspaper, looking for the comics, and he happened to see a headline about the murder of a boy named Iqbal who was about Craig’s own age.

Craig read about how Iqbal had been sold into slavery in South Asia at the age of four and spent six years chained to a carpet-making machine, working day and night. Iqbal had escaped, told his story to the world, and started fighting against child slavery.

Now, the story said, Iqbal had been killed to stop his campaign for freedom.

That terrible story touched something in Craig, and he determined to pick up Iqbal’s cause and work to free children from slavery, poverty, and ignorance. It was a big ambition for a twelve-year-old, but Craig says Iqbal’s story proved that the bravest voice could live in the smallest body.

So, Craig cut the article out of the paper, took it to his school in Thornhill, Ontario, and asked his classmates if they wanted to help. Eleven other kids put their hands up . . . and that was the start of the group Craig called “Free The Children.”

Together, they set out to raise funds, tell people about the plight of child slaves worldwide, and—above all—to help those children get the freedom and education they needed.

Craig’s friends told other friends, parents, teachers . . . the word spread quickly and Free The Children grew by leaps and bounds. Soon, they were working with other groups in third world countries, getting support from companies and associations, and creating their own education and development programs.

Today, Free The Children is the world’s largest network of children helping children through education. There are more than one million youth involved in forty-five countries worldwide. They build schools, provide clean water and health care, and fight against the abuse and neglect of children . . . everything to make life better for other children and youth.

Craig Kielburger is now a grown man, but continues to dedicate his entire life to the cause he started when he was twelve. He flies all over the world, giving speeches and working with various groups that share his passion for justice. Here at home, he helps organize and support student leaders and others who want to change the world for the better.

And it all happened because Kielburger saw something disturbing in the newspaper, and refused to just turn the page.

Want to know more? Free The Children

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© Copyright 2011, LIAP Media Corp.

LIAP Media Corp. the publisher of the Live Your MAGIC!™ series of books is a social enterprise. Part of the Larry & Janet Anderson Philanthropies

All author Royalties and publishing profits are donated to our charity, education and arts partners.


Terry Fox – Hero

 

Terry Fox

When a teenager gets cancer and then loses a leg at age 20, you might forgive him for giving up on any big dreams. But Canadian Terry Fox refused to give up. In fact, he started dreaming bigger than ever.

Terry was determined to raise money for cancer research to help other young people. So, he decided to do something no-one had ever done before — to run some five thousand miles across Canada, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, on one real and one artificial leg.

Terry prepared for 18 months running over 5000 kilometers (3,107 miles).
He set out quietly on April 12, 1980, dipping his artificial leg in the waters of Newfoundland. Starting that day, and every day that followed, he ran 25 miles. Through rain and shine, despite pain and exhaustion, from early morning darkness to long after sunset, he ran the equivalent of a marathon every day.

By halfway through his run, Terry had captured the hearts of his nation. Huge crowds appeared by the sides of lonely highways to cheer him on. He visited the notorious Kingston Penitentiary and the hardened inmates wept at his courage and determination.

Terry never finished his heroic run. His cancer spread to his lungs and he was forced to quit on September 1, 1980 near Thunder Bay, Ontario after running for 143 days and 5,373 kilometers (3,339 miles).

Terry’s goal was to raise $1 dollar for every Canadian to fund cancer research, a total of $24 Million. When Terry had to quit his raise a groundswell of support from across Canada inspired by Terry’s courage continued the fundraising efforts and by February 1, 1981 Terry’s Marathon of Hope had raised the $24 Million.

Terry got to see his dream realized, but on June 28, 1981, at the age of 22, Terry Fox died of the disease he had battled so hard.

Terry inspired new dreams, new commitment, to follow his example and continue to raise money for cancer research through Terry Fox Runs. In 1988 the Terry Fox Foundation was established to coordinate and manage Terry’s legacy. To date, Spring 2011, close to $500 Million has been raised for cancer research and over 5,000 locations in Canada plan a Terry Fox Run this September.

Terry Fox is remembered by Canadians as their greatest hero of all time, and the best example of courage in action.

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This is a excerpt from my forthcoming book, Inspiration to Live Your MAGIC!™ to be published in January 2012. A collection of 75 biographical introductions that inspire. © Copyright 2011, LIAP Media Corp.

LIAP Media Corp. the publisher of the Live Your MAGIC!™ series of books is a social enterprise. Part of the Larry & Janet Anderson Philanthropies.

All author Royalties and publishing profits are donated to our charity, education and arts partners.

Inspiration to Live Your MAGIC!™ -- Now available at - Amazon.com