Margaret Thatcher: Edmonton, A City of Achievers

Margaret Thatcher was the keynote speaker at the Edmonton Oilers fundraising dinner for Junior Achievement in February, 1997. I was there, and in her speech she described Edmonton, as “a city of achievers.” She was an amazing orator and it was an honor to be there.

Margaret Thatcher was quite the achiever herself. Born into modest circumstances in Grantham, Lincolnshire, on October 13, 1925, she became the first of her family to attend University. In 1979, she was elected Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, the only woman to have held the post, and remained in office until 1990, making her the longest serving Prime Minister of the 20th Century.

Margaret Thatcher, dead at 87, on April 9, 2013.

Margaret Thatcher In Her Own Words

Where there is discord, may we bring harmony. Where there is error, may we bring truth. Where there is doubt, may we bring faith. And where there is despair, may we bring hope.

If you want something said, ask a man; if you want something done, ask a woman.

To those waiting with bated breath for that favorite media catchphrase, the U-turn, I have only one thing to say. You turn if you want to; the lady’s not for turning.

Pennies don’t fall from heaven, they have to be earned here on earth.

No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he’d only had good intentions. He had money as well.

We always have to be aware of the enemy within, which is much more difficult to fight and more dangerous to liberty.

Any woman who understands the problems of running a home will be nearer to understanding the problems of running a country.

If you just set out to be liked, you would be prepared to compromise on anything at any time and you would achieve nothing.

In her Eulogy of Ronald Reagan: We have lost a great president, a great American, and a great man, and I have lost a dear friend…Ronald Reagan knew his own mind. He had firm principles and, I believe, right ones. He expounded them clearly. He acted upon them decisively. When the world threw problems at the White House, he was not baffled or disorientated or overwhelmed. He knew almost instinctively what to do.

I have taken the liberty to rewrite the closing of her eulogy for Ronald Reagan, which seems so perfect a tribute to her too.

Margaret’s mind was clouded by illness. That cloud has now lifted. She is herself again, more herself than at any time on this Earth, for we may be sure that the Big Fellow upstairs never forgets those who remember him. And as the last journey of this faithful pilgrim took her beyond the sunset, and as heaven’s morning broke, I like to think, in the words of Bunyan, that “all the trumpets sounded on the other side.”

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